Beautiful New York

A Celebration of the City

Category Archives: 10 Best List

The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #58

Brooklyn Public Library Architect: Githens & Keally Style: Art Deco Use: Museum Opened: 1941 Borough: Brooklyn Intended to abstract the image of a book standing open, the delicious gold leaf-crusted entrance of the central library perfectly complements the geometry of the streets that radiate from Grand Army Plaza. As the Art Deco period was waning, …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #59

St. Paul’s Chapel (Columbia University) Architect: I. N. Phelps Stokes Style: Roman Revival Use: House of Worship Opened: 1907 Borough: Manhattan One of the few buildings on the campus of Columbia University not designed by McKim, Mead & White, Stokes’ masterpiece is a holy confection inside and out. Vaulted with Guastavino tile, its dazzling acoustics …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #60

Brooklyn Museum Architect: McKim, Mead & White Style: Beaux Arts Use: Museum Opened: 1897 Borough: Brooklyn Opened in the advent of the Great Consolidation, Brooklyn’s monument to artistic culture is often overlooked, but shouldn’t be. The original beaux arts façade decorated with Daniel Chester French statues marries starkly yet seamlessly with its more modern glass …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #61

Wagner College, Main Hall Architect: Smith, Conable & Powley Style: Neo-Tudor Use: Education Opened: 1930 Borough: Staten Island Staten Island’s most beautiful building is the centerpiece of a liberal arts college that moved to the island over a decade before its construction but did not become coeducational or nonsectarian until later. The charming irony of …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #62

Pythian Apartments Architect: Thomas W. Lamb Style: Art Deco Use: Residential Opened: 1927 Borough: Manhattan Now an 88-unit luxury condominium apartment building, this crown jewel of West 70th Street was originally built as a temple for the fraternal organization, the Knights of Pythias. Whimsically decorated with Egyptian motifs, the building offers little surprise that architect …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #63

278 Clinton Avenue Architect: Unknown Style: Baroque Revival Use: Residential Opened: c. 1884 Borough: Brooklyn Now divided into seven units, this 3-room mansion in Clinton Hill was built for the 19th-century chemist Behrend H. Huttman. Alas, virtually nothing else is known about this brick and terra cotta gem that graces the block where Standard Oil …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #64

22 Pendleton Place Architect: Charles Duggin Style: Villa Use: Residential Opened: 1855 Borough: Staten Island This Victorian confection in the neighborhood of New Brighton was built for ferry owner William Pendleton in the mid-19th century. Still in residential use (now for double occupancy) over 160 years later, it is a New York City Landmark and …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #65

The Eldorado Architect: Emery Roth, Margon & Holder Style: Art Deco Use: Residential Opened: 1930 Borough: Manhattan One of the great “twin-towered” residential buildings of Central Park West, this deco gem has been home to Sinclair Lewis, Garrison Keillor, Faye Dunaway, and Alec Baldwin, among others. The Eldorado’s position on the full block from 90th …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #66

Williamsburg Savings Bank Architect: George B. Post Style: Roman Revival Use: Bank Opened: 1875 Borough: Brooklyn Since the golden age of banking palaces has given way to increasingly sterile and corporate-looking bank branches, the beautiful old banks of yesteryear are changing in their uses. Like many, the Williamsburg Savings Bank, with its Pantheonesque dome, has …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #67

Dime Savings Bank Architect: Mowbray & Uffinger Style: Roman Revival Use: Bank Opened: 1908 Borough: Brooklyn The notion of incorporating a beautiful domed building, landmarked by the city, into a supertall skyscraper may make many historic preservationists bristle. But that is one of the complications that the notion of “air rights” brings to a vertical …

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