Beautiful New York

A Celebration of the City

Monthly Archives: June, 2017

BIRTHDAY TRIBUTE — Lena Horne

Happy 100th Birthday to the late, great Lena Horne! Born in Brooklyn, Horne joined the chorus line at the Cotton Club when still a teenager and toured with Noble Sissle before moving to Hollywood. After appearing in such classics as Cabin in the Sky and Stormy Weather, she came back to the Big Apple nightclubs …

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It Happened Today in New York City

On June 29, 2002, the Museum of Modern Art opened MoMA QNS at a former Swingline staple factory in the neighborhood of Long Island City. The museum’s famed midtown location had closed a month before in preparation for a two-year renovation that would significantly expand its gallery space and curatorial department. A portion of its …

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It Happened Today in New York City

On June 28, 1942, the FBI captured eight German marines in civilian clothes on Long Island. The Germans had landed in a U-boat and brought explosives ashore, apparently intended for such targets as the Hell Gate Bridge and Newark Penn Station, among others. Their subsequent hearing in front of the U.S. Supreme Court sparked a …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #56

Cooper-Hewitt Museum Architect: Babb, Cook & Willard Style: Anglo-Italianate Use: Museum Opened: 1903 Borough: Manhattan Once the final home of Andrew Carnegie, this is one of only two former mansions on Museum Mile to still have its lawn and wrought iron fence intact (the Frick Collection is the other). The first home in the U.S. …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #57

The Jewish Museum Architect: C.P.H. Gilbert Style: French Revival Use: Museum Opened: 1904 Borough: Manhattan Once housing a single family of six, the former Warburg mansion is now home to the world’s oldest still-extant Jewish museum. Gilbert was inspired by Richard Morris Hunt, the first American architect trained at Paris’ Ecole des Beaux-Arts, so the …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #58

Brooklyn Public Library Architect: Githens & Keally Style: Art Deco Use: Museum Opened: 1941 Borough: Brooklyn Intended to abstract the image of a book standing open, the delicious gold leaf-crusted entrance of the central library perfectly complements the geometry of the streets that radiate from Grand Army Plaza. As the Art Deco period was waning, …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #59

St. Paul’s Chapel (Columbia University) Architect: I. N. Phelps Stokes Style: Roman Revival Use: House of Worship Opened: 1907 Borough: Manhattan One of the few buildings on the campus of Columbia University not designed by McKim, Mead & White, Stokes’ masterpiece is a holy confection inside and out. Vaulted with Guastavino tile, its dazzling acoustics …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #60

Brooklyn Museum Architect: McKim, Mead & White Style: Beaux Arts Use: Museum Opened: 1897 Borough: Brooklyn Opened in the advent of the Great Consolidation, Brooklyn’s monument to artistic culture is often overlooked, but shouldn’t be. The original beaux arts façade decorated with Daniel Chester French statues marries starkly yet seamlessly with its more modern glass …

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The Top 100 Greatest NYC Buildings — #61

Wagner College, Main Hall Architect: Smith, Conable & Powley Style: Neo-Tudor Use: Education Opened: 1930 Borough: Staten Island Staten Island’s most beautiful building is the centerpiece of a liberal arts college that moved to the island over a decade before its construction but did not become coeducational or nonsectarian until later. The charming irony of …

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It Happened Today in New York City

On June 21, 1932, Jack Sharkey won the Heavyweight Championship of the World from Max Schmeling at the new Madison Square Garden Bowl in Long Island City, Queens. The two had fought before with the opposite result and Sharkey’s split-decision victory was met with controversy, giving birth to the now cliché commentary “We wuz robbed!” …

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